The Stonehenge Scrolls Reviews

 The Stonehenge Scrolls

I am in awe of Karen Robbins!

By Carla J. Pantelakis on November 5, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition

Karen Robbins grabs your attention from the first paragraph and does not let go. Suli is one heck of strong woman who can handle any challenge, including completing the construction of Stonehenge. WOW! I could see everything so clearly in her descriptions of the area and in each of the characters. I always wondered how they moved those stones, why they put them where they did and what happened to the people. I cannot say enough about Robbins research and eloquent writing.

If there was a six star rating, I would give it.

Hats off to Karen Robbins! I want more.

***

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful

Stonehenge Scrolls is a good Buy from Amazon

By Eldon T. Winston on January 6, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

My wife got Stonehenge Scrolls on her Kindle from Amazon and found the story interesting but much more. It presents a fictional reconstruction of archeological and “historical” evidence of the Stonehenge period and provides a believable narrative which has many cultural ideas of the period. She stuck with the story as she learned to use the Kindle and is urging me to read it, too.

***

Sunrises and sunsets will never be the same!

By Lola of WPA on December 17, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition

Robbins is brilliant! The results of Robbins research and travels to Stonehenge is woven into a tale in a very clever manner. It was interesting “seeing” how Stonehenge could have been built and the way that civilization of so long ago had to evolve in order to erect this sacred circle. It’s a good read!

***

Stonehenge Scrolls

By Jean Goldbach on December 9, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

I enjoyed K.P. Robbins’ writing style. I also enjoyed the inclusion of the archaeologist’s blogs which gave credence to the author’s story.

***

Amazing Storytelling

By KatGiof on December 8, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

I loved this book! So much so that I read it twice – back to back! The first time, I was so caught up in the story of the relationship between Sulis and her father, Myrddin I raced through the book. Myrddin’s indulgence of his daughter by educating her to become a Monument Builder and, the training to be a medicine woman by her Grandmother, Ogwyn, is the perfect blend of science, fact and fiction. And, covering all bases, Robbins weaves the love story between Sulis and Gwyr into this incredible tale. My second reading was to take the time to thoroughly enjoy this multi-layered tale about building Stonehenge. Author K.P. Robbins weaves a wonderful tale. I can’t wait to read her next book.

***

A fully explored fantastical hypothesis about Stonehenge!

By John M. Cross on December 2, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

As an inveterate tumulus climber and stele observer, I was immediately taken with Karen P. Robbins’ hypothesis on the construction of Stonehenge in her novel, Stonehenge Scrolls.

Stonehenge, for those few who don’t know about it, is a collection of huge stones, arranged in rings in such a way that the sun casts shadows and appears in perfect positions at various times of the year. It’s been thought to be a monument to religion, and it’s the largest of such stone structures in the British Isles. How it got there was a mystery, examined and studied by historians and archeologists for many years.

But Stonehenge isn’t the only reminder that Celtic people on the fringes of Europe in Ireland and Britain, and even Brittany in western France, had a civilization that existed long before the Romans arrived. It was perhaps contemporaneous with the Egyptian pyramid builders. Structures in Ireland, the most famous is perhaps Newgrange, and throughout England and Scotland point to a significant knowledge of construction and astronomy. In France a huge structure on a bluff predates the Egyptian pyramids and was found only 60 years ago. The Cairn of Bernanez near Morlaix was thought to be a mound of dirt and rocks! Inside is Europe’s oldest megalithic mausoleum. It’s the same with structures found nearby on the French coast only six years ago at Kerdruelland, described as a time machine in the French press.

Robbins, with a great of research that shows up throughout the novel she’s written, puts all of this construction into perspective, competently and thoroughly, as she weaves her tale based on the builders of Newgrange in Ireland and Stonehenge in England. From the idea that a group of builders existed in the Pictish pre-Iron Age civilization, to the rise of a female leader, the tale continues to weave reality out of hypothesis. What makes this more interesting though is the way Robbins intersperses a modern (fictional) archeologist, who comments on twists and turns in the story.

Without giving away too much of the story, someone finds a metal box containing a memoire dating from Roman days that explains the civilization that constructed Stonehenge and other Bronze Age buildings as the civilization is about to be destroyed. The story is compelling in its rationality, told as the last survivor of the civilization runs before the Roman conquerors.

If modern man can only learn that a hill of rocks were in Brittany contained a Stone Age tomb in the mid-1950s, or find other historical constructions less than 10 years ago, then the hypothesis of the novel becomes even more real and plausible. In any case, this is a very good hypothesis on which to build a highly readable novel, exploring the culture of the times (from 21st century eyes, of course), and how Celtic pre-historic men and women reacted to changes and new ideas. The characters are fully woven, the language isn’t stilted like so much fantasy. The ideas of a reality far different from our own are superb.

***

Compelling Book About Creation of Stonehenge

By SPB on November 28, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

This book is both informative about how life was lived many centuries ago, as well as being an engrossing story. It uses an intriguing style of telling the story from the perspective of those involved in the creation of Stonehenge, interwoven with a modern perspective from the voice of a “blogger.” A great book from an interesting new author. I definitely recommend it.

***

Interesting how it gives a seed for later King Arthur and Merlin tales

By GuinneeHen on March 16, 2014

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

While giving a plausible how and why for the building of Stonehenge, the author has thrown in a possible source for the Merlin of Arthurian legend and the unifying king as well. The storytelling itself was a bit plodding and slow and almost lost my interest. I persevered though and was rewarded with a satisfying tale.

***

Stonehenge Explored in a Novel Way

By rgibbs on December 15, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

If you’ve ever wondered how Celtic pre-historic people could ever have moved those huge stones to create Stonehenge, this book presents a plausible explanation. Embedded in an engrossing novel, Robbins spins the tale of Myrddin, a skilled stone builder and his only child Sulis, a strong female who defies tradition to follow in her father’s footsteps. A good read!

***

Recommend you read Stonehenge Scrolls

By Subaru Sal on November 20, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

I loved the multiple point of view related to the story: you have the last Druid Priest who is writing down the verbal history because the Romans are killing the priests and their history will die with him; a current day archaeologist who is involved in the found Scrolls and has started a blog about them; and best of all the fictional characters who are living the creation (expansion) of Stonehenge. Ms. Robbins weaves a wonderful mix of fact and fiction to intrique the reader.

***

Again?

By katie lyle on October 14, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

I hoped to find something new here, but there isn’t. Tedious account of a not-very-real character. I love stories that revisit history, but this one was so boring I quit reading it halfway through.

***

Interesting plot and characters tied into Stonehenge history

By Donald E. Wallace on October 5, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

The characters were developed well, were diverse, and tied in to Stonehenge itself. The plot had enough action to keep my interest through the entire book.

***

Stonehenge Scrolls, a mystery, an enigma

By Andrea Grenadier on June 9, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

As one who is familiar with Karen Robbins’ fine writing over the years, and knowing of her (healthy) obsession with Stonehenge, I was very interested to read what I knew would be a fascinating take on its history. I am not one who is intrinsically fascinated with Stonehenge, although I do have a passing interest in Scottish cairns, so I was hoping to not only be entertained, but educated, as well.
I thought Karen did a wonderful, thoughtful job with the story, and I found myself intrigued by the characters, especially Myrddin and his daughter Sulis. I found the moving and building of the Stone Circle fascinating, and the author paints a vivid picture of this. The characters, I felt, could have been given more dimension, and some variance in the way they spoke, since they all talked the same way, and their particular personalities didn’t come out in the form of any verbal quirks and tics that define speech, and they various ways that men and woman address each other.
Where there is happiness, however, you know there’s going to be a jealous Uthne around the corner, and in the story, he provides a dark, entrenched power that fights to resist change. I was greatly moved by the funeral scene for a main character, and felt I didn’t get to spend enough time with him. For Myrddin is the hinge on which the story is told — a builder who defies tradition by teaching his daughter — and I felt that he was taken too soon from the story. Which, of course, makes him a successful character, because you want him to be around for the final, great circle.
I was not enamored of Maeve Haley’s blog entries, which I found a distraction from the story. Some of the observations were a bit off-base, too, a little flippant, and not helpful to the story. But in contrast, I found the fictional characters more compelling than the ones who were posing question in the blog. Perhaps that’s just me as a reader, since I don’t like distractions from the current action that dissolve the flow of the story. I learned a lot about the monument builders, and thought the story really sang when their work was in progress.
A rich and well-told story, I’m looking forward to Karen’s next one!

***

The Stonehenge Scrolls

By Donkey on June 7, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

I haven’t finished this book because I am reading other books. But, it does give a new insightful way of how the stones were moved and written as if it were being observed at the time. Interesting concepts and always a mystery in how they did it and what they are for. The “Blue Stones” were mentioned and how they were moved from such a great distance. Somebody went way out of their way to move those stones and in the circular manor for reasons still unknown today. Some say it was for sacrifice rituals or use as a calendar when the sun shined through the stones on one day of the year. I am sure I will find out more when I finish the book. It is worth reading. There is some humour in it with one of his helpers too!

***

A SO-SO BOOK

By Sharon in Spokane on May 31, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

The archeological details were very interesting. The thesis that a united culture is an essential ingredient for a civilization to evolve was informative. I couldn’t unite with the characters of the novel. They seemed two dimensional. The story dragged.

***

Lame

By Susan Mazur on May 2, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

this book is quite lame. Jumps from actually reading the “scrolls” to reading the “blog” of the reporter who is investigating them. The “scrolls” are some of the lamest writing…. incomprehensible names for the scroll “writers,” who are supposedly writing in ancient times, yet using wording idioms like “hey,” in the very next sentence. I tried to slog through it, but just had to stop after a time. May return to reading it, but I’ll have to be really desperate for something to read.

***

Something for Everyone Here!

By Donna S. Reilly on March 18, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition

K.P. Robbins’ obvious passion about Stonehenge and her intensive research of her subject and the era definitely shine through in her book The Stonehenge Scrolls. I particularly like how Ms. Robbins makes the story modern with the Washington Press announcement of the scroll discovery and archeology expert Maeve Haley’s blog explaining the events, culture, and beliefs of prehistoric times. Because of her research of the people, medicines, and sciences of the Stonehenge age, the writer is able to weave a VERY CREDIBLE tale.

I’m also struck by the author’s very realistic creation of a strong heroine, as studies of women in ancient times do bear out that often women were in a priestess and healer role and very revered by their clan’s men and women. The story made me contemplate our current view of women, who, for centuries, have struggled to achieve a prominent and meaningful place in modern society and CONTRIBUTE their knowledge and skills to improve the human lot. Robbins’ character Solis captures what she, and many women and men who would follow her, continue to believe and strive for: “I turned to look all around my circle. Power and awe radiated from the stones themselves. Generations from now, women and men will come to this place and see, set in stone, our knowledge of the sun (new discoveries, masculine energy) and moon (old but valuable healings, the Dead and reverence for same, and female energy) our belief in life and rebirth, and our unity as a people.” Parentheses are mine.

Good job, K.P. Robbins. Your passion for “the Stones” has paid off in a wonderful story!

Donna Segreti Reilly

***

History Was Intriguing

By M. hamed on March 18, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

The use of a narrative and blog to complement each part of the story was and interesting style. After I got into the story it made more sense what was going on. The actual story became more compelling as it progressed, but then it was over…just like that. No lead up, just sort of a drop off the cliff. Or perhaps I missed something, I wanted t hear more about the heroine.

***

OK Stonehenge Scrolls upon reading.

By William Drennen on February 14, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition

Finally got the book on my iPhone, read it in a day and a half and was captured by it entirely. Good history and a compelling story, which is what all good history is, even if it is fiction. The journey to the construction of the monuments is about real people only two millenia past. Congratulations Karen!

***

A Good tale Well Told

By GIS on February 7, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

The author clearly put in a lot of research and hard work to write this novel. Her knowledge of Stonehenge is phenomenal, and she does an excellent job of weaving in details about Stonehenge engineering with the stories of creative and complex characters.

She makes us care about those characters and their lives from page one and keeps us fascinated throughout.

My only “complaint” is that the story is too short. It left me wanting much more.

***

Amateurish

By Elpop on January 28, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

Although I thought the theory of how stones were moved interesting; a good bit was tedious
and very dry. The characters were well defined, but too much of the story was dull

***

Great read

By MarKarwow on January 26, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition

From knowing little about Stonehenge, I was taken with the romance of the novel and the background research Karen Robbins did. I found the details and the logistics of monument building fascinating. Can’t wait for the next novel.

***

PEDESTRIAN

By Bruce Burton on January 23, 2013

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

PREDICTABLE, PEDESTRIAN, LIGHTWEIGHT. FOR A NOVICE READER IT MIGHT GIVE AN APPETIZER, BUT NOT FOR AN EXPERIENCED FAN OF THE GENRE. BETTER INVESTMENTS IN THIS GENRE FOUND WITH A LITTLE SEARCHING.

***

great read

By Hampton on November 25, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

A “Clan of the Cave Bear” set in ancient Ireland. This book combines archeology, botany, physics, genetics, history and math with a wonderful mystical love story. The descriptions of the locations in Ireland are just like to rural Ireland today. My only complaint is that the narrator from the present who ties the story to today’s fact can be distracting. It would be better to put that all at the end of the book. Interesting and fun, you’ll love it.

***

If I had…

By William M. Drennen, Jr…. on December 27, 2012

Format: Kindle Edition

If I had actually gotten this book on my IPhone I would have reviewed it but it’s still not there. Not in the cloud, not on my computer, not on my Touch, or my Phone.
Where is it?